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Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center

Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center

North Texas’s 7,000-square-foot Mean Green Strength and Conditioning Center is located on the first floor of the Athletic Center, less than 100 yards from the student-athlete residences in Victory Hall, and is available to all UNT student-athletes, male and female.

In addition to its goal of building athletes’ muscle mass and tone, the strength and conditioning program also helps drastically reduce injuries and is a key part of the rehabilitation process.

The Center features over 16,000 pounds of weights, including 12 Power Lift Multi-Purpose Racks, six Power Lift Olympic Platforms and more than 30 Hammer Strength machines, equalling or exceeding the facilities of its regional and national rivals.

The facility is overseen by a permanent staff of trainers and coaches, lead by head strength coach Chris Seroka, who previously held the same position at SEC powerhouse LSU. A 1988 graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi, he was a three-year letter winner in football, a two-year letter winner in baseball and played in the 1989 Senior Bowl.

The football program has its own strength and conditioning coach in Frank Wintrich, who implented a program with a far greater intensity level than ever before at North Texas. It’s not a cookie-cutter weightlifting program; instead, it’s tailored to individual athletes, to the team’s style of play, and to the each player’s position. That personalization goes far beyond a player’s level of fitness. For example, a middle linebacker may train differently than an outside linebacker, or a running quarterback will train differently than a pocket passer to address the different physical requirements of his position. Is a defensive end going to drop back into coverage? Is a running back going to run inside or will he be asked to catch passes?

“We’ve created a program to enable kids to do those things,” Wintrich said.